Wikipedia

Search results

Me of the Sumerians; the Nam Shub of Enki


We never feel just one emotion. Emotions arise in blooms with cohorts. I mean, anger for example. We're never only angry. At first sight it might feel like we are, but another emotion colors the fury. We might also feel hurt, or betrayed, or belittled, or offended, or abused, lied to, or a pollen cloud of other emotions. We're angry for a reason. Emotions do not segregate. Positive and Negative emotions associate freely with each other inside the same causation. I can be in love with the same person I am angry at, or about. I may not wish to be alone, but wish to be left alone. These are not conflicting. They are not at odds. The contrast causes no schism.

We also never have just one thought. We're not thinking a single thought, not ever -- if we did then the heart stops and death comes savagely. But even higher into our conscious awareness, as we speak, we are watching who we are addressing. We are measuring what has been said, against context. We're estimating, inferring, building, extrapolating coda outside our awareness, beyond what we know -- While we are judging our adversary, we also think these other things.

We listen to tones in voices and estimate by what words do to eyes.  

So, we are never thinking one thing, and we are never feeling one emotion. We think in matrix and feel in tides. Experience is what you get when those two talk. Beyond thought, beyond awareness, or the memory of either. Experiences are metaphoric collections of living. Not of life, but of _living_. 

In concert, experiences are commutable. An experience can be imparted to another, and through empathic transference another can undergo the fission or horripilate originally felt by the author.

A story which transfers knowledge and emotion as experience is a Me (may)


If you read a Me I wrote about how to write a novel, when you were finished you would have the experience of writing one. You will for all intents and purposes, have written one. You'll know and a have felt everything about the process I explained in the story. That was what Me meant. A Me does not only impart academic information but real life experience as well. 




THE NAM SHUB OF ENKI 

Once upon a time, there was no snake, there was no scorpion,

There was no hyena, there was no lion,

There was no wild dog, no wolf,

There was no fear, no terror,

Man had no rival.

In those days, the land Shubur-Hamazi,

Harmony-tongued Sumer, the great land of the me of prince ship,

Uri, the land having all that is appropriate,

The land Martu, resting in security,

The whole universe, the people well cared for,

To Enlil in one tongue gave speech.

Then the lord defiant, the prince defiant, the king defiant,

Enki, the lord of abundance, whose commands are trustworthy,

The lord of wisdom, who scans the land,

The leader of the gods,

The lord of Eridu, endowed with wisdom,

Changed the speech in their mouths, put contention into it,

Into the speech of man that had been one.

_Translated from ancient Sumerian._



The Dub of meh: Possible Causation of Feeling Down

Feeling Fearful? Bad? Depressed? 
Do You Have Low Frequency Protection? 

Sound systems and Entertainment Center option on your computer:

I was inside the sound settings on my laptop, now that I have it using the large flat screen - which is outstanding by the way ... five foot screen? Oh, yeah. — and came across the Low Frequency Protection. Not knowing what this was about, I looked into it.

In the Windows 10 settings (new settings, not old control panel), you find it like this:

  1. Sound.
  2. Under "Output", click "Device properties"
  3. Under "Related settings", click "Additional device properties"
  4. In the window that opens, go to the tab "Enhancements"
  5. Check "Low frequency protection"
  6. Click "Settings"

Bass tones, at these low frequencies, are known as Infrasounds.

Infrasounds are an issue around industrial districts where heavy machinery is pounding out parts or stamping out plates or 'thudding' is happening. There are some interesting studies regarding the possibility that infrasound is the at the foundation of Haunted house reports and UFO encounters.

After some follow up research, I discovered a couple of things. First, typically the setting is defaulted for 80 Hz. Second, the default is for protection to be off. Which is fine if you understand what it means, and are down for the experience.

The closer the bass gets to 20 Hz, the more noticeable the effect, but the effect begins at under 50 Hz.

I like bass; I like the vibration. Big fan of Bass and Drum Techno... however, I'm not a big fan of Terror or being Terrorized. And that is the effect of low tone and sub-bass under 50Hz.

You probably won't realize what's going on, and if you have Major Depression, you could — like I have over the years — just passed it off as a 'bad day' ... we get those — or do we? See, I'm not so sure. Because a lot of musicians and movie soundtracks will use those low tones, at 20Hz or 10Hz... you can't hear that or become aware of the tone. You also couldn't figure out where it was coming from if you could hear it... but you feel it... oh yes, you will feel it — pure terror.

Which, of course, is exactly why movie directors and bands use the infrasound bass — for effect. To send a thrill of terror into you. It's all chemical. The vibrations at that frequency cause disruptions and chemical releases you have no control over. It just happens, like a pure tone can shatter glass. Bam!, and it's a bad day.

Again, if you are aware, then it's a roller coaster ride, kind of fun. But if you're not...

... but now you are.

The Four Basic Styles of Communication

A Reminder before we begin:


I'm a fiction writer. Why I post these is for other writers, and to keep them in a place I can find them easy — because I use these all the time to help develop character personality types and Passive/Aggressive is useful in many ways for secondary characters. I've yet to use it for MCs. It would be an excellent addition for character arch. The trait is easy to recognize as well, adding to the immersion experience for the reader.  They come in all shapes and sizes. Some a brilliant but don't believe it. Some are back-stabbing little dweebs who are just trying to get a little closer to your back. 

So, have fun and let's get started. 

PASSIVE COMMUNICATION is a style in which individuals have developed a pattern of avoiding expressing their opinions or feelings, protecting their rights, and identifying and meeting their needs.

As a result, passive individuals do not respond overtly to hurtful or anger-inducing situations. Instead, they allow grievances and annoyances to mount, usually unaware of the buildup. But once they have reached their high tolerance threshold for unacceptable behavior, they are prone to explosive outbursts, which are usually out of proportion to the triggering incident.

After the outburst, however, they may feel shame, guilt, and confusion, so they return to being passive.

Passive communicators will often:

  • fail to assert for themselves
  • allow others to deliberately or inadvertently infringe on their rights
  • fail to express their feelings, needs, or opinions
  • tend to speak softly or apologetically
  • exhibit poor eye contact and slumped body posture

The impact of a pattern of passive communication is that these individuals:

  • often feel anxious because life seems out of their control
  • often feel depressed because they feel stuck and hopeless
  • often feel resentful (but are unaware of it) because their needs are not being met
  • often feel confused because they ignore their own feelings

A passive communicator will say, believe, or behave like:
  • “I’m unable to stand up for my rights.”
  • “I don’t know what my rights are.”
  • “I get stepped on by everyone."
  • “I’m weak and unable to take care of myself.”
  • “People never consider my feelings.”

2. AGGRESSIVE COMMUNICATION


AGGRESSIVE COMMUNICATION is a style in which individuals express their feelings and opinions and advocate for their needs in a way that violates the rights of others. Thus, aggressive communicators are verbally and/or physically abusive.

Aggressive communicators will often:

  • try to dominate others
  • use humiliation to control others
  • criticize, blame, or attack others
  • be very impulsive
  • have low frustration tolerance
  • speak in a loud, demanding, and overbearing voice
  • act threateningly and rudely
  • not listen well
  • interrupt frequently
  • use “you” statements
  • have an overbearing or intimidating posture

The impact of a pattern of aggressive communication is that these individuals:

  • become alienated from others
  • alienate others
  • generate fear and hatred in others
  • always blame others instead of owning their issues, and thus are unable to mature

The aggressive communicator will say, believe, or behave like:

  • “I’m superior and right and you’re inferior and wrong.”
  • “I’m loud, bossy and pushy.”
  • “I can dominate and intimidate you.”
  • “I can violate your rights.”
  • “I’ll get my way no matter what.”
  • “You’re not worth anything.”
  • “It’s all your fault.”
  • “I react instantly.”
  • “I’m entitled.”*
  • “You owe me.”
  • “I own you.”


3. PASSIVE-AGGRESSIVE COMMUNICATION

PASSIVE-AGGRESSIVE COMMUNICATION is a style in which individuals appear passive on the surface but are really acting out anger in a subtle, indirect, or behind-the-scenes way. People who develop a pattern of passive-aggressive communication usually feel powerless, stuck, and resentful – in other words, they feel incapable of dealing directly with the object of their resentments. Instead, they express their anger by subtly undermining the object (real or imagined) of their resentments.

Passive-Aggressive communicators will often:
  • mutter to themselves rather than confront the person or issue
  • have difficulty acknowledging their anger
  • use facial expressions that don't match how they feel - i.e., smiling when angry
  • use sarcasm
  • deny there is a problem
  • appear cooperative while purposely doing things to annoy and disrupt
  • use subtle sabotage to get even

The impact of a pattern of passive-aggressive communication is that these individuals:

  • become alienated from those around them
  • remain stuck in a position of powerlessness (like POWs)
  • discharge resentment while real issues are never addressed so they can't mature

The passive-aggressive communicator will say, believe, or behave like:

  • “I’m weak and resentful, so I sabotage, frustrate, and disrupt.”
  • “I’m powerless to deal with you head on so I must use guerilla warfare.”
  • “I will appear cooperative but I’m not.”

4. ASSERTIVE COMMUNICATION


ASSERTIVE COMMUNICATION is a style in which individuals clearly state their opinions and feelings, and firmly advocate for their rights and needs without violating the rights of others. These individuals value themselves, their time, and their emotional, spiritual, and physical needs and are strong advocates for themselves while being very respectful of the rights of others.

Assertive communicators will:

  • state needs and wants clearly, appropriately, and respectfully 
  • express feelings clearly, appropriately, and respectfully 
  • use “I” statements 
  • communicate respect for others 
  • listen well without interrupting 
  • feel in control of self 
  • have good eye contact 
  • speak in a calm and clear tone of voice 
  • have a relaxed body posture 
  • feel connected to others 
  • feel competent and in control 
  • not allow others to abuse or manipulate them 
  • stand up for their rights

The impact of a pattern of assertive communication is that these individuals:

  • feel connected to others
  • feel in control of their lives
  • are able to mature because they address issues and problems as they arise
  • create a respectful environment for others to grow and mature


The assertive communicator will say, believe, or behave in a way that says:

  • “We are equally entitled to express ourselves respectfully to one another.”
  • “I am confident about who I am.”
  • “I realize I have choices in my life and I consider my options.”
  • “I speak clearly, honestly, and to the point.”
  • “I can’t control others but I can control myself.”
  • “I place a high priority on having my rights respected.”
  • “I am responsible for getting my needs met in a respectful manner.”
  • “I respect the rights of others.”
  • “Nobody owes me anything unless they’ve agreed to give it to me.”
  • “I’m 100% responsible for my own happiness.”


Do Swear Words have a Purpose?

Should you use swear words? There are quite a few opinions out there about whether they should be used. Some people feel that there is nothing intellectual or edgy about swear words -- That they have no artistic value, and only show a lack of skill.

The first thing I want to know when asked about this topic, and many others that come in the form of "Is it alright to..?" is to know if the concern is as a Writer? or Morally? I can't help with morals. I don't find moral evaluation effective for fiction writing. Just about everything I post on this blog is from the POV of being a writer, and creating stories which have immersion value for the reader. With that in mind:

Perhaps a strong argument could be made that profanity itself is not intellectual. Maybe you could even make an argument -- that, aside from those who have endured injuries to the brain, or suffer from mental conditions, which make swearing an act beyond their control -- using profanity demonstrates a lack of intelligence. However, using fuck properly as a writer is intellectual. 

Studies show that sex-related insults in particular are common across cultures (Flynn, 1976), so they are good tools for keeping the reader inside the story, with a strong, impacting word. No matter what culture you are raised in, if you speak English, you are not going to be confused about the meaning of Fuck in the context of the scene.

Vocabulary Effect

Take a quick check of your emotional state at this point. How do you feel over all? Note levels of stress or tense muscles. Take a breath and relax. There are several memes in this article which will likely cause tense or stressful feelings as you continue to read. Be mindful and allow the feeling. Notice what happens when you read these words. Make notes. 
Having command of a lexicon, which is cross-culturally understood has obvious value to a writer, no matter what that writer strives in producing. This is hardly an intellectual justification for a small subset of the vocabulary, when there are others which could claim the same level of understanding. But there are qualities in certain words which other words do not possess.

A while back I posted a piece on the power particular words have on us:

Writers use words as tools, as keys, even as a mode of travel -- but it has come to my attention that many writers, even experienced novelists, don't really divine the concept that 'words have power'. Take for example the word yawn. Yawn is short, and basic. Yawn is not a command, and thus benign. Yawn is even a common word. We hear the word yawn all the time. When someone yawns, however, other people yawn.  In fact, you don’t even need to see me yawn do you? No. You don’t. You just have to read the word yawn, a few times, and your mind will react just like the word yawn was a real yawn, instead of just a word on the page.

Not enough novelists give this the consideration it deserves. It should be passed on with greater frequency, but even we minimize phrases like “Words have power”, hearing it as an esoteric belief, rather than a fact that has more than three decades of rigorous study behind the concepts to back them up -- with repeatable results. We feel or believe that this belongs to another era, the 70s perhaps -- when in fact it is more apt now than it ever was – in any other age.

So, back to what we are talking about, we know that insults, especially insults that refer to the act of sex a physically affecting. However, simply referring to sex or genitalia is not sufficient to make a word or phrase taboo. Our reaction to the word “fuck” is much different than our reaction to “coitus,” “make love,” or even “have sex.” There is also nothing special about the sounds or syllables in the word “fuck.” Close-sounding words—such as “duck,” “truck,” and ”buck”—are not prohibited and in some cases can serve as a more socially appropriate substitution for what everyone understands was meant to be a curse word, for example “mothertrucker!” (Pinker, 2007).

In certain situations swear words and taboo phrases have their uses: mainly to evoke a strong negative reaction from someone. Speech perception is nearly automatic in mature individuals (Pinker, 2007). Try this: don’t think of an apple. Did you think of an apple anyway when you read the word “apple”? With swear words, your mind
immediately drags up whatever offensive combination of forceful descriptors of the nastier aspects of things we may not want to think about.

Swear words are also useful and effective ways of conveying that you feel strongly about something or inciting strong feelings in someone else, even when used outside of their traditional definitions (Jay, 2009a; Pinker, 2007). Saying that something is “bloody amazing” does not mean that that thing was literally bloody, but adding the term “bloody” to the phrase gives it extra emotional emphasis.

However, swearing is not always about evoking negative emotions; swearing itself can also be a cultural phenomenon.

Denotations and connotations are associated with any word when you hear them, but swear words are more primal. Their connotations more profound on the reader, or listener. These make swear words powerful insults and forceful descriptors of the nastier aspects of things -- yes -- but also they are bridges to other aspects of meaning and description. For example:

The willingness to break a cultural taboo in front of others creates an atmosphere of informality and sense of community. A realism that pulls the reader into an emersion. If taboos are defined by the greater society, then an environment where subverting those taboos is acceptable creates a smaller, more intimate society inside of the greater society (Pinker, 2007).

Using this information it is easy to see how this is useful to demonstrate a MCs history. For example, your MC is a District Attorney. For the last three chapters he's dealt with criminals, but not once has he used profanity. He talks to the Mayor, to lawyers, to police officers. Perhaps these other characters have used profanity, or maybe not, but he has not. In chapter four he visits his parents house, and when he finds his cousin there, he says, "Holy shit motherfucker! When did you get back?"

We instantly feel that there is a strong bond between these two characters, and that they share a relationship that perhaps no one else in the family is a part of. It's personal, and intimate. It also demonstrates a level of trust between them. 


Another interesting use of taboo language is as a cathartic experience, a way of expressing and alleviating pain, frustration, stress, or regret (Jay et al. 2006). A classic example of this would be shouting “damn it” after hitting yourself with a hammer while trying to nail something down.

Swearing was also shown to increase the ability of subjects to tolerate pain (Stephens, 2011).


Using neuroimaging techniques such as PET (positron emission tomography) scans, they demonstrated that a small part of the brain called the amygdala is highly active when exposed to threatening, and vulgar words (Isenberg, 1999).

The amygdala is part of the limbic system, one of the primitive parts of the brain responsible for processing emotion and memory. In particular, amygdala activity is correlated with negative emotional associations; stimulating the amygdala can cause panic attacks and aggressive behaviors, while destroying the amygdala causes unusual placidness or fearlessness (Zald, 2003; Davis, 2001). Therefore, it makes sense that the amygdala would be activated in association with unpleasant words such as swear words. The amygdala also makes several connections to memory and association centers in the brain, which could also be responsible for the increased memory response when subjects are presented with swear words (Davis, 2001).

Is swearing harmful?

“Swearing can occur with any emotion and yield positive or negative outcomes. Our work so far suggests that most uses of swear words are not problematic.”

 ~ Timothy Jay and Kristin Janschewitz
The use of swearing in both aphasia and GTS gives us a real insight into how swearing works in the brain. Individuals with aphasia have damaged the normal parts of the brain which produce formal language, such as Broca’s area or Wernicke’s area, found in the left hemisphere of the brain. The fact that they continue to be able to swear suggests that swearing is localized outside of these damaged areas, and is handled differently than other parts of their vocabulary. Psychologist Chris Code, who studied individuals who had their left hemispheres removed, proposed that swear words and several other types of speech preserved in aphasic individuals fall into a category of “lexical automatisms” or automatic speech, which are localized to the right hemisphere instead of the left one (Code, 1996; Van Lancker 1999).

Swear words for fiction writers are tools. If you use them properly, the rise in emotional levels of the reader, plus the increased memory signature for the details described by the passage can enhance the story.

 But if you're just saying fuck to say fuck, well, fuck it.

Check out 100 Happy Words, and 100 not so happy


Further Reading



GTP and ME and Chess

You: Give me an annotation of the following game, noting and highlighting tactics, positioning, shifts in momentum and their causes, as we...